Coming out of thes hell: building the molecular infrastructure for research on parasite-harbouring snails (Cantacessi, C., Prasopdee, S., Sotillo, J., Mulvenna, J., Tesana, S., Loukas, A.).

Coming out of thes hell: building the molecular infrastructure for research on parasite-harbouring snails. Enlace
Reseña PLoS NTD September 12, 2013 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0002284
Autores Cantacessi, C., Prasopdee, S., Sotillo, J., Mulvenna, J., Tesana, S., Loukas, A.
Contribución A pesar de los cerca de 300 millones de personas que sufren alguna parasitosis transmitida por caracoles, los esfuerzos que se ponen en el estudio de estos hospedadores intermediarios son cada vez menores. Con la publicación del transcriptoma de Bythinia siamensis goniomphalos queremos contribuir con las últimas tecnologías en biología molecular al estudio del hospedador intermediario de Opisthorchis viverrini, y puede servir como base de datos de referencia para el estudio genético de los caracoles vectores de helmintos.
Resumen In Thailand and Laos alone, approximately 10 million people are infected with the liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini. Chronic infection with this parasite is considered the leading cause of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA, orbile-duct cancer) in large areas of Southeast Asia. In these regions, CCA caused by O. viverrini is typically diagnosed 30–40 years after infection, with death occurring within 3–6 months post diagnosis. O. viverrini is characterized by a three-host lifecycle, with prosobranchs nails of the genus Bithynia and cyprinid fishes acting as first and second intermediate hosts, respectively, while piscivorous mammals, including dogs, cats, and humans, act as definitive hosts. Over the last two decades, much attention has been paid to studies on the epidemiology, developmental biology, and diagnosis of O. viverrini, while recent biotechnological advances are contributing large-scale explorations of the fundamental molecular biology of this liver fluke, with a view toward identify ingkey molecules essential for its development, reproduction, and survival, as well as dissecting the molecular pathways leading to th e development of CCA. These advances provide a solid foundation for the development of novel strategies to fight this devastating disease. However, long-term control of O. viverrini–induced cancer strictly relies on the development of integrated approaches, targeting the parasite as well as its intermediate hosts.
Grupo de investigación Centre for Biodiscovery and Molecular Development of Therapeutics, James Cook University, Smithfield, Queensland, Australia

 © James BraunLuismi

Anuncios

Responder

Introduce tus datos o haz clic en un icono para iniciar sesión:

Logo de WordPress.com

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de WordPress.com. Cerrar sesión / Cambiar )

Imagen de Twitter

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de Twitter. Cerrar sesión / Cambiar )

Foto de Facebook

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de Facebook. Cerrar sesión / Cambiar )

Google+ photo

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de Google+. Cerrar sesión / Cambiar )

Conectando a %s